Use Serjeanty In A Sentence

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Serjeanty

[ˈsärjən(t)ē]

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Looking for sentences with "Serjeanty"? Here are some examples.

1. serjeanty is to be distinguished from offices held hereditarily "in gross". These are not serjeanties, as they were not incidents of the tenure of a manor or other land. They are heritable in the same way as baronies by writ , so that they can pass to a daughter where there is no male heir, and be split between daughters as co-heiresses if
2. Define serjeanty. serjeanty synonyms, serjeanty pronunciation, serjeanty translation, English dictionary definition of serjeanty. or n a type of feudal tenure accompanied by an obligation to serve the king in a specified personal capacity Collins English Dictionary – Complete and: 3.
3. Define serjeanty. serjeanty synonyms, serjeanty pronunciation, serjeanty translation, English dictionary definition of serjeanty. or n a type of feudal tenure accompanied by an obligation to serve the king in a specified personal capacity Collins English Dictionary – Complete and
4. serjeanty definition, a form of land tenure in which a tenant holding of the king rendered him exclusive services in a status below that of a knight. See more.
5. SERJEANTY, Eng. law. A species of service which cannot be due or performed from a tenant to any lord but the king; and is either grand or petit serjeanty.
6. Definition of serjeanty in the D dictionary. Meaning of serjeanty. What does serjeanty mean? Information and translations of serjeanty in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web.
7. Sergeanty, from Latin serviens, also spelled sergeantry, serjeanty, or serjeantry, in European feudal society, a form of land tenure granted in return for the performance of a specific service to the lord, whether the king or another. Sergeants included artisans, bailiffs within the lord’s realm, domestic servants, and sometimes those who provided the lord with some form of military service.
8. Serjeant may refer to: . The holder of a serjeanty, a type of feudal land-holding in England; A generally obsolete spelling of sergeant, although still used in some British Army regiments, notably The Rifles; Serjeant-at-arms, an officer appointed to keep order during meetings; Serjeant-at-law, an obsolete class of barrister in England and Ireland; Craig Serjeant (born 1951), Australian former
9. Alternative Title: grand serjeanty. Learn about this topic in these articles: description. In sergeanty. In England there was a grand sergeanty, a tenure so noble that it ranked socially above knight service, and a petty sergeanty, a tenure so meagre that it ranked with the peasants’ tenure, called socage. In origin there was no distinction
10. serjeanty definition: Noun (plural serjeanties) 1. (UK) A form of land ownership under the feudal system, where a family held an estate in exchange for rendering a service to their liege lord.The manor of Scrivelsby in England has, since the Middle Ages
11. SERJEANTY, Eng. law. A species of service which cannot be due or performed from a tenant to any lord but the king; and is either grand or petit serjeanty.
12. Tenure by serjeanty was a form of land holding in Medieval England (and is also used of similar forms in Continental Europe) under the feudal system, intermediate between tenure by knight service and tenure in socage.Origins and developmentIt…
13. serjeanty or sergeanty (both: sär`jĕntē), a type of tenure tenure, in law, manner in which property in land is held. The nature of tenure has long been of great importance, both in law and in the broader economic and political context.
14. serjeanty (countable and uncountable, plural serjeanties) (Britain, historical) A form of land ownership under the feudal system, where a family held an estate in exchange for rendering a service to their liege lord.
15. serjeanty or sergeanty (both: sär`jĕntē), a type of tenure tenure, in law, manner in which property in land is held. The nature of tenure has long been of great importance, both in law and in the broader economic and political context.
16. serjeanty or sergeanty (both: sär´jĕntē), a type of tenure in English feudalism in which the tenant held his lands from the king or overlord in return for the performance of some personal, often menial, service. Examples of such duties ranged from that of king's constable or chamberlain to that of supplying arrows for an overlord when he went hunting.
17. ‘Vivian de Davenport, son of Richard, had a grant of the magisterial serjeanty of the hundred of Macclesfield from Randle Blundeville, Earl of Chester, by the charter annexed, made during the justiceship of Phillip de Orreby, and abbacy of Hugh Grylle.’

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