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See also: Homophily Homophile Homophilic Homophilous Homologous Homogeneous Homograph Homophone Homogenize Homogeneity Homo Homogenized Homophobe Homophonic Homonym Homophonous Homophobia Homogeny Homogenic Homology Homogenization Homozygous

1. Homophily synonyms, Homophily pronunciation, Homophily translation, English dictionary definition of Homophily

Homophily

2. Homophily, literally "love of sameness," is a sociological theory that similar individuals will move toward each other and act in a similar manner

Homophily

3. Coined in 1954 by social scientists Paul Lazarsfeld and Robert Merton, the idea of Homophily has been expanded by evolving media…

Homophily, Has

4. Definition of Homophily in the Definitions.net dictionary

Homophily

5. What does Homophily mean? Information and translations of Homophily in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web.

Homophily

6. In the 1950s, sociologists coined the term “Homophily” — love of the same — to explain our inexorable tendency to link up with one another in ways that confirm rather than test our core

Homophily

7. To put it briefly, Homophily means “love of the same”

Homophily

8. Homophily can be directly observed in the virtual worlds using analytical techniques, for example Huang et al (2009) showed that in the Massive Online Role-Playing Game Everquest players tended to interact with other players of similar age, experience and who lived near them in the real world.

Homophily, Huang

9. Homophily, the tendency of people to interact with similar people, is a widespread phe-nomenon that has been studied in a variety of di erent elds, ranging from economics (Ben-habib et al.,2010), to organizational research (Borgatti and Foster,2003), social psychology

Homophily, Has, Habib

10. Homophily is the principle that a contact between similar people occurs at a higher rate than among dissimilar people

Homophily, Higher

11. The pervasive fact of Homophily means that cultural, behavioral, genetic, or material information that flows through net-works will tend to be localized

Homophily

12. This principle—the Homophily principle—structures network ties of every type, including marriage, friendship, work, advice, support, information transfer, exchange, comembership, and other types of relationship

Homophily

13. Homophily (i.e., "love of the same") is the tendency of individuals to associate and bond with similar others

Homophily

14. The presence of Homophily has been discovered in a vast array of network studies

Homophily, Has

15. Within their extensive review paper, sociologists McPherson, Smith-Lovin and Cook (2001) cite over one hundred studies that have observed Homophily in some form or another.

Hundred, Have, Homophily

16. Loosely translated, Homophily is your desire and ability to gravitate towards like-minded individuals

Homophily

17. The Homophily principle declares that the probability of a social tie between two individuals becomes smaller the more different those two individuals are from one another in some socially-salient characteristic such as age, education, income, occupation, religion, racial/ethnic group or …

Homophily

18. The Homophily bias is relevant during all developmental stages, from early childhood through to adulthood

Homophily

19. Homophily was once the dominant form of social interaction, but heterogeneous social environments make the idea of an unencumbered Homophily impossible (or, at least, unrealistic) in most circumstances

Homophily, Heterogeneous

20. What does Homophily mean? A theory in sociology that people tend to form connections with others who are similar to them in characteristics such a

Homophily

21. While Homophily is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon, we believe that our model highlights a very basic force underlying Homophily that future analysis of the phenomenon may take into account

Homophily, Highlights

22. Our extremely stylized model does not contain explicit elements of preferences, and Homophily is built in through the (fixed) cost of outbreeding.

Homophily

23. Homophily BIRDS OF A FEATHER FLOCK TOGETHER The term Homophily stems from study of social networks.

Homophily

24. She points to studies undertaken by researchers at the University of New Hampshire and elsewhere that suggests "Homophily" -- the principle that people naturally favor others like them -- may play a major role in early-stage funding.

Hampshire, Homophily

25. What is the definition of Homophily? What is the meaning of Homophily? How do you use Homophily in a sentence? What are synonyms for Homophily?

Homophily, How

26. It’s referred to as Homophily, or the love of the same (Dehghani et al, 2016)

Homophily

27. According to one study, Homophily in moral purity is a excellent predictor of …

Homophily

28. Yet Homophily is perhaps one of the most urgent places to start

Homophily

29. Today, the assumption that Homophily is a rule also underlies online social and economic interactions, as platforms reinforce the axiom that “similarity breeds connection.”

Homophily

30. Homophily social net[1] [5] [6] [20], the tendency of individuals to form association with individuals of similar socio-cultural background, becomes the basic governing structural component of any social network and it has been the focus of many social network studies [2] [7]

Homophily, Has

31. Homophily in this simple model means that social ties are more likely to be formed between two people who share a single characteristic, such as being male

Homophily

32. Homophily studies typically use either expected rates, relative rates or hybrid rates

Homophily, Hybrid

33. Homophily in social relations may lead to a commensurate distance in networks leading to the creation of clusters that have been observed in social networking services

Homophily, Have

34. Homophily is a key topic in network science as it can determine the speed of the diffusion of information and ideas.

Homophily

35. Homophily limits people's social worlds in a way that has powerful implications for the information they receive, the attitudes they form, and the interactions they experience

Homophily, Has

36. What is the definition of Homophily? What is the meaning of Homophily? How do you use Homophily in a sentence? What are synonyms for Homophily?

Homophily, How

37. The fact that similarity breeds connections, the principle of Homophily, has been well-studied in existing sociology literature

Homophily, Has

38. Homophily can allow a behavior to spread more successfully across a heterogeneous population, providing greater levels of exposure to individuals with diverse health characteristics

Homophily, Heterogeneous, Health

39. Second, Homophily can significantly increase the likelihood of adoption across dyadic ties, in particular among obese individuals.

Homophily

40. Homophily refers to the tendency for people to have (non-negative) ties with people who are similar to themselves in socially significant ways

Homophily, Have

41. Homophily unifies and fragments a network simultaneously

Homophily

42. While past Homophily research focused more on ties with similar others, bonding and bridging social capital research expands the scope of existing Homophily research

Homophily

43. Synonyms (Other Words) for Homophily & Antonyms (Opposite Meaning) for Homophily.

Homophily

44. Homophily: Homophily between mated pairs in animals has been extensively studied in the field of evolutionary biology in which it is known as assortative mating

Homophily, Has

45. Homophily between mated pairs is common within natural animal mating populations

Homophily

46. Homophily, the tendency to associate with similar others, is a fundamental pattern underlying human relationships

Homophily, Human

47. Although scholars largely agree on the definition of Homophily, their empirical measures of it vary widely

Homophily

48. This both raises the question of whether everyone is studying the same phenomenon and suggests that our understanding of Homophily is incomplete

Homophily

49.Homophily” is a remarkably useful term, a compact word that succinctly expresses the idea that “birds of a feather flock together” – that you’re likely to befriend, talk to, work with and share ideas with people who’ve got common ethnic, religious and economic background with you.

Homophily

50. Three metrics are used to assess communitarian features of partisan Facebook discussions: communitarian identification, mobilization, and Homophily.Communitarian identification is defined as a sense of group identity--that is, a feeling of belonging to a broader ideological community--and it is operationalized as the use of first-person plural pronouns (we, our) and the use of verbs in the

Homophily

51. Homophily is the principle that a contact between similar people occurs at a higher rate than among dissimilar people

Homophily, Higher

52. The pervasive fact of Homophily means that cultural, behavioral, genetic, or material information that flows through net-works will tend to be localized

Homophily

53. Homophily is a well-established phenomenon that has been observed to occur frequently in social networks, where users with similar contexts have a nature of connecting with one another constantly, and this principle is also a meticulously thought-out field in the domain of social sciences (Ma et al., 2015; Pan et al., 2019; Zhu and Chen, 2015; Halberstam and Knight, 2016; Han et al., 2018).

Homophily, Has, Have, Halberstam, Han

54. The scale is suggested for consideration by researchers concerned with Homophily or interpersonal similarity in human communication

Homophily, Human

55. There are three dimensions of Homophily-attitude, background, and demographic.

Homophily

56. Age Homophily results from the baseline Homophily to a high extent

Homophily, High

57. Homophily often leads to homogamy marriage between people with similar characteristics

Homophily, Homogamy

58. Contrary to the mainstream assumption, Homophily was not found

Homophily

59. Homophily is the perceived similarity between speaker and listener

Homophily

60. The opposite of Homophily is heterophily or intermingling.

Homophily, Heterophily

61. Homophily has implications in terms of how it a ects things like social mobility, decisions to undertake education, and the speed of di usion and learning in a society (e.g., see Calvo-Armengol and Jackson (2004, 2009), Jackson (2007), and Golub and Jackson (2008)), and school performance

Homophily, Has, How

62. Relative Homophily thus holds at the national level since Homophily is higher for the larger group, conservatives in this case

Homophily, Holds, Higher

63. Likewise, inbreeding Homophily is satisfied for both groups since the Homophily index, as shown in the final column, exceeds the population share for both groups.

Homophily

64. Homophily is the reason why we won’t allow your friend or spouse to attend the focus group with you, the reason why we won’t complete more than one telephone survey with a household, and the reason why surveys through social media networks …

Homophily, Household

65. A Study of Homophily on Social Media: 10.4018/978-1-61350-513-7.ch002: Similarity breeds connections, the principle of Homophily, has been well studied in existing sociology literature

Homophily, Has

66. Homophily and to show how it a ects convergence time

Homophily, How

67. To extend this exercise beyond the simple structure of the islands model, we introduce a general measure of Homophily that works in any multi-type random network

Homophily

68. This measure is called spectral Homophily

Homophily

69. This principle—the Homophily principle—structures network ties of every type, including marriage, friendship, work, advice, support, information transfer, exchange, comembership, and other types of relationship

Homophily

70. Homophily, a proposition that has long been accepted (McPherson, Smith-Lovin and Cook 2001) but never really tested at a societal level

Homophily, Has

71. This study also breaks new ground by exploring how life stages and friendship sources interact to induce different kinds of Homophily, specifically educational and racial/ethnic Homophily.

How, Homophily

72. In sum, Homophily is a significant determinant of cross-country director appointments

Homophily

73. Importantly, the authors consider both the supply and demand effects of Homophily on the market for foreign-based directors

Homophily

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Dictionary

HOMOPHILY [həˈmäfəlē]

NOUN

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the definition of homophily?

Homophily definition, the tendency to form strong social connections with people who share one’s defining characteristics, as age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, personal beliefs, etc.: political homophily on social media.

How does homophily affect diffusion?

Homophily influences diffusion patterns over a social network in two ways: homophily affects the way a social network develops, and individuals are more likely to successfully influence others when they are similar to them. Homophily often leads to homogamy—marriage between people with similar characteristics.

What does the name homophilic mean?

(hə-mŏf′ə-lē) n. A theory in sociology that people tend to form connections with others who are similar to them in characteristics such as socioeconomic status, values, beliefs, or attitudes. ho·moph′i·lous adj.

What is homophily in journalism?

In news aggregator: Media theory …on journalism is that of homophily. Homophily, literally "love of sameness," is a sociological theory that similar individuals will move toward each other and act in a similar manner. Coined in 1954 by social scientists Paul Lazarsfeld and Robert Merton, the idea of homophily has been expanded by evolving media….

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